The Pentagon mobilizes all forces; What seems to be a danger threatening them?

Russia and China are testing supersonic weapons – a new type of weapon that is difficult to intercept

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Several Pentagon units, including the Space Forces, are working on systems to track and prevent attacks with this type of weapon.

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According to “National Interest”, taking into account the speed of maneuvering supersonic weapons and the distance they can cover, this type of weapon poses a significant new threat to American soldiers. Therefore, it is not surprising that the US Space Forces are dealing with this problem.

The space forces have an advantage in this matter: they can timely, efficiently recognize, detect and track such weapons in space, said the chief scientific associate of the US space forces, Joel Moser.

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Today, supersonic weapons are considered a threat for various reasons – they can hit targets at sea, on land, and even in space. That is why the Pentagon is asking a number of questions. For example, what happens if an anti-satellite weapon starts moving at supersonic speeds? How to protect large objects from it – from ships to satellites? Although many topics in this context are closed to the general public, the author of the article suggests a discussion on the question: how necessary is it for a supersonic interceptor to fly at supersonic speed? Can a supersonic weapon be hit by a laser? How the radar network and launch warning system should operate in order to be able to track the flight of a supersonic weapon?

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Considering the degree and character of the threat, it is not surprising that different units of the US armed forces are working on it together, the authors of the article writing.

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